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atlas magellanic cloud atlas

Web site news




I have recently added 2 "tours" of the Small Magellanic Cloud and one of the Large Magellanic Cloud, designed to help observers navigate their way through some of the more spectacular areas of these glalxies. The link to these PDFs is under SMC or LMC on the menu above. I will shortly be posting the next LMC tour.


Ian Cooper co-author of "NIght Sky Observer's Guide" Vol III has published a very detailed JPG chart of the SMC. Thise chart is very comprehensive and well worth a look.


Don't forget, if you have notes, images, sketches, articles, links or anything that is relvant to the Magellanic Clouds that you'd like to see on this site, please email me.

Contact   patrick@cloudsofmagellan.net.au     

magellanic clouds large magellanic cloud small magellanic cloud observing guide to magellanic clouds star charts magellanic clouds observing notes magellanic clouds images magellanic clouds charts small magellanic cloud charts large magellanic cloud observing large magellanic cloud observing small magellanic cloud

The Small Magellanic Cloud

Located 200,000 light years from Earth, the Small Magellanic Cloud contains the mass of about 7 billion suns. It also boasts a large number of deep sky objects for viewing and like the Large Magellanic Cloud has very different conditions for star formation to our own galaxy. With good charts, it is a little easier to navigate than the LMC. Click on the image to go to the Small Magellanic Cloud section.


How to find the Small Magellanic Cloud


Image by Greg Bradley

The Large Magellanic Cloud

The Large Magellanic Cloud is an irregular barred galaxy about 160,000 light years from the Earth. It is thought to contain about 15 billion stars and is home to the largest star-forming region in the Local Group of Galaxies. Easily visible to the naked eye in Southern latitudes, its wealth of deep sky treasures is readily accessible to modest amateur telescopes.


Image by Marco Lorenzi

Image from NASA/ESA, STScI hubblesite.org

Clouds of Magellan web site under construction 

  

This web site is dedicated to making it easier to navigate the Magellanic Clouds, to encourage observing and imaging of them and to provide links to some of the research into these extraordinary and stunning galaxies.


When I first turned my telescope towards the ragged patch of luminance that is our neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, I was awe struck by the myriad patterns of tiny stars and intricate mazes of nebulosity that met my eye. I was overwhelmed by the beauty of the sight and by the question "what am I looking at". This web site has been established in response to queries on astronomy forums for charts and information on Magellanic Clouds. In time will become a place for people to share their notes, images and sketches

Clouds of Magellan